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Goal 2 | Medication | 2 of 5
Taking Medication
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Do you or your loved one take insulin or another type of medication?

“I take insulin.”

video

It's worth knowing that there are three basic categories of insulin: bolus, basal, and premixed.

The kind of insulin your doctor will prescribe for you depends on several factors: your diet and exercise habits, your age, and your body's response to insulin, as well as how often you are willing or able to test your blood glucose on your own and to take insulin injections.

In addition to injectable insulin, there is now inhaled insulin available. This short-acting form of insulin is taken using a small inhaler. It is typically used with long-acting insulin to control blood glucose levels.

In addition to insulin, there are now insulin analogs. These are genetically engineered types of insulin that are similar to the insulin your pancreas makes, but are changed slightly to allow for slower or faster action. They are injected, just like insulin. Insulin analogs include long-acting, basal insulins (glargine and determir) and rapid acting, bolus insulins (lispro, aspart, and glulisine).

insulin injection abdomen

Insulin must be injected (usually in the abdomen or given through an insulin pump because it would be destroyed in the stomach if taken orally (with the exception of inhaled insulin). Giving yourself injections may seem scary at first, but with practice you will overcome that fear. Ask your doctor to show you how to give yourself an injection properly.

Remember, your goal is effective blood glucose management. If your insulin isn't bringing your blood glucose test numbers down enough, or is making your blood glucose too low (a condition called hypoglycemia), talk to your doctor. You may need to switch to a different type of insulin.

Insulin should be stored in the refrigerator, as it is very sensitive to extreme temperatures. (Be sure to make accommodations when traveling!) Discard insulin that is past its expiration date or that hasn't been stored properly.

Here's a very helpful tool for guiding you through your mealtime insulin use.

Has your insulin dosage changed at any time?

One of the challenges involved with using insulin is that your needs may change over time. Diabetes is a progressive disease, and over time the pancreas may produce less insulin, or the body may become more resistant to insulin's effects. Therefore, it's sometimes necessary to make changes to your treatment plan in order to manage your blood glucose as effectively as possible. One way to do this is to change the type or dose of insulin you take.

insulin pump

Medication can make your diabetes go away.

False:

While type 2 diabetes can't be cured, medication can help you live a healthy life with reduced risk of complications.

The role of medication in helping you manage your diabetes is to help keep your blood glucose in a healthy range. Left untreated, diabetes can lead to serious, even life-threatening complications—other diseases or conditions that are related to diabetes. Complications can lead to loss of vital functions (such as with your kidneys), blindness amputation of lower limbs, and even death (especially from cardiovascular disease). By taking your medications as directed, you greatly reduce your risk of getting complications.

body complications

Sometimes, when people are first diagnosed with diabetes, they change their diet, become more physically active, and lose weight. This all causes their blood glucose to go down, and they sometimes think they've been cured. But that's not the case, unfortunately. Over time, diabetes progresses—insulin resistance increases, for example, or the pancreas produces less insulin than it did before. When these things happen, blood glucose levels begin to rise again, and it becomes necessary to treat diabetes with medication in addition to a healthy diet and plenty of physical activity. To remain healthy when you have diabetes means a lifelong commitment to maintaining a healthy lifestyle, and in many cases, treatment with medication.

Correct!

While type 2 diabetes can't be cured, medication can help you live a healthy life with reduced risk of complications.

The role of medication in helping you manage your diabetes is to help keep your blood glucose in a healthy range. Left untreated, diabetes can lead to serious, even life-threatening complications—other diseases or conditions that are related to diabetes. Complications can lead to loss of vital functions (such as with your kidneys), blindness amputation of lower limbs, and even death (especially from cardiovascular disease). By taking your medications as directed, you greatly reduce your risk of getting complications.

body complications

Sometimes, when people are first diagnosed with diabetes, they change their diet, become more physically active, and lose weight. This all causes their blood glucose to go down, and they sometimes think they've been cured. But that's not the case, unfortunately. Over time, diabetes progresses—insulin resistance increases, for example, or the pancreas produces less insulin than it did before. When these things happen, blood glucose levels begin to rise again, and it becomes necessary to treat diabetes with medication in addition to a healthy diet and plenty of physical activity. To remain healthy when you have diabetes means a lifelong commitment to maintaining a healthy lifestyle, and in many cases, treatment with medication.

“I take insulin and oral medication.”

video

It's worth knowing that there are three basic categories of insulin: bolus, basal, and premixed.

The kind of insulin your doctor will prescribe for you depends on several factors: your diet and exercise habits, your age, and your body's response to insulin, as well as how often you are willing or able to test your blood glucose on your own and to take insulin injections.

In addition to injectable insulin, there is now inhaled insulin available. This short-acting form of insulin is taken using a small inhaler. It is typically used with long-acting insulin to control blood glucose levels.

In addition to insulin, there are now insulin analogs. These are genetically engineered types of insulin that are similar to the insulin your pancreas makes, but are changed slightly to allow for slower or faster action. They are injected, just like insulin. Insulin analogs include long-acting, basal insulins (glargine and determir) and rapid acting, bolus insulins (lispro, aspart, and glulisine).

insulin injection abdomen

Insulin must be injected (usually in the abdomen or given through an insulin pump because it would be destroyed in the stomach if taken orally (with the exception of inhaled insulin). Giving yourself injections may seem scary at first, but with practice you will overcome that fear. Ask your doctor to show you how to give yourself an injection properly.

Remember, your goal is effective blood glucose management. If your insulin isn't bringing your blood glucose test numbers down enough, or is making your blood glucose too low (a condition called hypoglycemia), talk to your doctor. You may need to switch to a different type of insulin.

Insulin should be stored in the refrigerator, as it is very sensitive to extreme temperatures. (Be sure to make accommodations when traveling!) Discard insulin that is past its expiration date or that hasn't been stored properly.

Here's a very helpful tool for guiding you through your mealtime insulin use.

Has your insulin dosage changed at any time?

One of the challenges involved with using insulin is that your needs may change over time. Diabetes is a progressive disease, and over time the pancreas may produce less insulin, or the body may become more resistant to insulin's effects. Therefore, it's sometimes necessary to make changes to your treatment plan in order to manage your blood glucose as effectively as possible. One way to do this is to change the type or dose of insulin you take.

insulin pump

Medication can make your diabetes go away.

False:

While type 2 diabetes can't be cured, medication can help you live a healthy life with reduced risk of complications.

The role of medication in helping you manage your diabetes is to help keep your blood glucose in a healthy range. Left untreated, diabetes can lead to serious, even life-threatening complications—other diseases or conditions that are related to diabetes. Complications can lead to loss of vital functions (such as with your kidneys), blindness amputation of lower limbs, and even death (especially from cardiovascular disease). By taking your medications as directed, you greatly reduce your risk of getting complications.

body complications

Sometimes, when people are first diagnosed with diabetes, they change their diet, become more physically active, and lose weight. This all causes their blood glucose to go down, and they sometimes think they've been cured. But that's not the case, unfortunately. Over time, diabetes progresses—insulin resistance increases, for example, or the pancreas produces less insulin than it did before. When these things happen, blood glucose levels begin to rise again, and it becomes necessary to treat diabetes with medication in addition to a healthy diet and plenty of physical activity. To remain healthy when you have diabetes means a lifelong commitment to maintaining a healthy lifestyle, and in many cases, treatment with medication.

Correct!

While type 2 diabetes can't be cured, medication can help you live a healthy life with reduced risk of complications.

The role of medication in helping you manage your diabetes is to help keep your blood glucose in a healthy range. Left untreated, diabetes can lead to serious, even life-threatening complications—other diseases or conditions that are related to diabetes. Complications can lead to loss of vital functions (such as with your kidneys), blindness amputation of lower limbs, and even death (especially from cardiovascular disease). By taking your medications as directed, you greatly reduce your risk of getting complications.

body complications

Sometimes, when people are first diagnosed with diabetes, they change their diet, become more physically active, and lose weight. This all causes their blood glucose to go down, and they sometimes think they've been cured. But that's not the case, unfortunately. Over time, diabetes progresses—insulin resistance increases, for example, or the pancreas produces less insulin than it did before. When these things happen, blood glucose levels begin to rise again, and it becomes necessary to treat diabetes with medication in addition to a healthy diet and plenty of physical activity. To remain healthy when you have diabetes means a lifelong commitment to maintaining a healthy lifestyle, and in many cases, treatment with medication.

“I take insulin, oral and other medication.”

video

It's worth knowing that there are three basic categories of insulin: bolus, basal, and premixed.

The kind of insulin your doctor will prescribe for you depends on several factors: your diet and exercise habits, your age, and your body's response to insulin, as well as how often you are willing or able to test your blood glucose on your own and to take insulin injections.

In addition to injectable insulin, there is now inhaled insulin available. This short-acting form of insulin is taken using a small inhaler. It is typically used with long-acting insulin to control blood glucose levels.

In addition to insulin, there are now insulin analogs. These are genetically engineered types of insulin that are similar to the insulin your pancreas makes, but are changed slightly to allow for slower or faster action. They are injected, just like insulin. Insulin analogs include long-acting, basal insulins (glargine and determir) and rapid acting, bolus insulins (lispro, aspart, and glulisine).

insulin injection abdomen

Insulin must be injected (usually in the abdomen or given through an insulin pump because it would be destroyed in the stomach if taken orally (with the exception of inhaled insulin). Giving yourself injections may seem scary at first, but with practice you will overcome that fear. Ask your doctor to show you how to give yourself an injection properly.

Remember, your goal is effective blood glucose management. If your insulin isn't bringing your blood glucose test numbers down enough, or is making your blood glucose too low (a condition called hypoglycemia), talk to your doctor. You may need to switch to a different type of insulin.

Insulin should be stored in the refrigerator, as it is very sensitive to extreme temperatures. (Be sure to make accommodations when traveling!) Discard insulin that is past its expiration date or that hasn't been stored properly.

Here's a very helpful tool for guiding you through your mealtime insulin use.

Has your insulin dosage changed at any time?

One of the challenges involved with using insulin is that your needs may change over time. Diabetes is a progressive disease, and over time the pancreas may produce less insulin, or the body may become more resistant to insulin's effects. Therefore, it's sometimes necessary to make changes to your treatment plan in order to manage your blood glucose as effectively as possible. One way to do this is to change the type or dose of insulin you take.

insulin pump

Medication can make your diabetes go away.

False:

While type 2 diabetes can't be cured, medication can help you live a healthy life with reduced risk of complications.

The role of medication in helping you manage your diabetes is to help keep your blood glucose in a healthy range. Left untreated, diabetes can lead to serious, even life-threatening complications—other diseases or conditions that are related to diabetes. Complications can lead to loss of vital functions (such as with your kidneys), blindness amputation of lower limbs, and even death (especially from cardiovascular disease). By taking your medications as directed, you greatly reduce your risk of getting complications.

body complications

Sometimes, when people are first diagnosed with diabetes, they change their diet, become more physically active, and lose weight. This all causes their blood glucose to go down, and they sometimes think they've been cured. But that's not the case, unfortunately. Over time, diabetes progresses—insulin resistance increases, for example, or the pancreas produces less insulin than it did before. When these things happen, blood glucose levels begin to rise again, and it becomes necessary to treat diabetes with medication in addition to a healthy diet and plenty of physical activity. To remain healthy when you have diabetes means a lifelong commitment to maintaining a healthy lifestyle, and in many cases, treatment with medication.

Correct!

While type 2 diabetes can't be cured, medication can help you live a healthy life with reduced risk of complications.

The role of medication in helping you manage your diabetes is to help keep your blood glucose in a healthy range. Left untreated, diabetes can lead to serious, even life-threatening complications—other diseases or conditions that are related to diabetes. Complications can lead to loss of vital functions (such as with your kidneys), blindness amputation of lower limbs, and even death (especially from cardiovascular disease). By taking your medications as directed, you greatly reduce your risk of getting complications.

body complications

Sometimes, when people are first diagnosed with diabetes, they change their diet, become more physically active, and lose weight. This all causes their blood glucose to go down, and they sometimes think they've been cured. But that's not the case, unfortunately. Over time, diabetes progresses—insulin resistance increases, for example, or the pancreas produces less insulin than it did before. When these things happen, blood glucose levels begin to rise again, and it becomes necessary to treat diabetes with medication in addition to a healthy diet and plenty of physical activity. To remain healthy when you have diabetes means a lifelong commitment to maintaining a healthy lifestyle, and in many cases, treatment with medication.