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Goal 1 | Taking Control | 5 of 6
Controlling Diabetes (Monitoring)
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How important to you is regularly monitoring your A1C/blood glucose?

I follow a regular schedule.

It's great that you know how important it is to keep a check on your A1C and blood glucose. It's also important that your family knows as well … it can help them understand your symptoms and provide support.

(click to reveal more info!)

Know your patterns
Prevent short-term problems
Avoid long-term complications
Using a blood glucose meter

Note: Sometimes strips are an out-of-pocket expense (around $1 per strip), and testing costs can add up. How often people with diabetes need to check their blood glucose varies from person to person. So does their recommended target level. Be sure to talk with your healthcare provider about what is best for you so that you can avoid unnecessary expenses.

General Guidelines for Monitoring Blood Glucose for Type 2 Diabetes

Type of diabetesNumber of checksTiming Recommended target levels
Type 2 with insulin 2 or more per day Before meals; 2 hours after meals Before a meal: 90-130 mg/dL
Two hours after a meal: below 180 mg/dL
Type 2 with oral medicines 1 or 2 per day. With good blood glucose control, 3 days per week; with poor control, daily Before meals; 2 hours after meals Before a meal: 90-130 mg/dL
Two hours after a meal: below 180 mg/dL
Type 2 with diet-control no checks or 1 check per day Before breakfast when you wake up and can get a fasting blood glucose reading Before a meal: 90-130 mg/dL
Two hours after a meal: below 180 mg/dL

I do it when I think of it, either because I don't feel well or I forget.

It's very important to keep a check on your A1C and blood glucose in order to prevent complications from diabetes. It's also important that your family knows how important monitoring is … it can help them understand your symptoms and provide support.

(click to reveal more info!)

Know your patterns
Prevent short-term problems
Avoid long-term complications
Using a blood glucose meter

Note: Sometimes strips are an out-of-pocket expense (around $1 per strip), and testing costs can add up. How often people with diabetes need to check their blood glucose varies from person to person. So does their recommended target level. Be sure to talk with your healthcare provider about what is best for you so that you can avoid unnecessary expenses.

General Guidelines for Monitoring Blood Glucose for Type 2 Diabetes

Type of diabetesNumber of checksTiming Recommended target levels
Type 2 with insulin 2 or more per day Before meals; 2 hours after meals Before a meal: 90-130 mg/dL
Two hours after a meal: below 180 mg/dL
Type 2 with oral medicines 1 or 2 per day. With good blood glucose control, 3 days per week; with poor control, daily Before meals; 2 hours after meals Before a meal: 90-130 mg/dL
Two hours after a meal: below 180 mg/dL
Type 2 with diet-control no checks or 1 check per day Before breakfast when you wake up and can get a fasting blood glucose reading Before a meal: 90-130 mg/dL
Two hours after a meal: below 180 mg/dL